LMPD :: Louisville Metro Police Department
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76 Comments

68 arrested as protesters march to Churchill Downs, Cardinal Stadium

The group announced plans to march from South Central Park to the Louisville Metro Police Department Training Academy.

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RE: 68 arrested as protesters march to Churchill Downs, Cardinal...

September 7th, 2020 @ 9:00AM (10 months ago)

Guess our new Chief Gentry will fix all of this. You know the one who was never here before she left and we never saw. The one who got told to leave when she was over JCYC because she didn't or couldn't handle that Johnson our great Mayor fired her. You know the one who embarrassed herself and alienated metro council because she didn't know what the he'll she was doing and kept wasting taxpayer money with the office of safe and healthy neighborhoods. You know the one who if she has not removed them from Facebook said a lot of stuff about white privilege even after she went from being a sergeant to a colonel in like 3 years. Yeah, she is going to fix our department and city. No more violence or riots coming to the streets of louisville.

RE: 68 arrested as protesters march to Churchill Downs, Cardinal...

September 8th, 2020 @ 11:21AM (10 months ago)

It is illegal to instruct police not to enforce the law when there's a riot or other felony crime happening that police are aware of. That's especially when there's a danger of serious physical harm occurring if police don't take action. There are lots of examples of that, like when the BLM rioters were shooting fireworks at the entrance to the Hall of Justice with officers standing on the other side of the doorway, also known as attempted Arson 1st Degree.

Obstruction of Justice laws

Under Kentucky law, obstruction of justice is called "obstructing governmental operations" (519.020). A person is guilty of obstructing governmental operations when he intentionally obstructs, impairs or hinders the performance of a governmental function by using or threatening to use violence, force or physical interference. Obstructing governmental operations is a Class A misdemeanor. A Class A misdemeanor is punishable by 90 days to 12 months in jail and a fine of up to $500.

Under federal law, obstruction of justice is the frustration of governmental purposes by violence, corruption, destruction of evidence or deceit. There are several federal laws covering obstruction of justice, including 18 U.S. Code Title 73, which covers obstruction of criminal investigations, obstruction of state or local law enforcement and other forms of obstruction. Potential consequences for a conviction under federal charges of obstruction of justice vary depending on the act that was taken, up to and including life imprisonment or the death penalty if a murder was committed. To be convicted of obstruction of justice the prosecution needs to show: (1) There was a legal or government proceeding that could be obstructed. (2) There is a clear link between the attempts to obstruct and the proceedings. (3) The defendant was aware of this link.